Jun 03

Using WordPress with Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn

Twitter takes the title, image and then links, so this limits title length. Facebook takes the post content and makes it the FB post and then adds the packaged link with title, image and content. LinkedIn packages it together as a shared link and shows title, summary, and image. It’s probably best to always include an image, especially for Facebook. 


Updated: Facebook is inconsistent. If an image is included in the native post, then Facebook ignores the post title completely and only uses the post content, image, and then links to native post. 

Sep 10

29-Hours to Order the iPhone 7

It took me 29-hours to order the iPhone 7 Plus. 

I had decided well before the Apple keynote earlier this week, thanks to solid internet rumors, that a new iPhone 7 Plus would be in the cards for me. In fact, I went so far as to put my current iPhone in the Gazelle queue. Why the 7? I want the dual camera capabilities. The Apple event did not disappoint and I was easily sold on the Jet Black iPhone 7 Plus with 128mb even though I am still a little concerned about adjusting to the larger phone.

But it almost didn’t happen!

For for first time, I did the midnight purchase (I’m in California). It took until 12:05am before the order page loaded on the iPhone app. I was simultaneously refreshing on my laptop. By the time the order page loaded, the shipment date for the jet black was 2-3 weeks out. Wow, that’s one hot item! 

Then the order itself didn’t process correctly due to a reported issue with AT&T but I was given a confirmed “reservation” indicating my spot in line and that I’d receive an email from Apple to finish the transaction later. No payment made at this point. I went to bed and come morning there was the email from Apple with the link to complete the transaction. 

It didn’t work. 

The first issue was a custom Apple 404 error page during the third step of ordering. That continued until late morning. Once that started working, I got to the checkout screen only to be stopped by a requirement that I make a deposit with AT&T and that I’d have to do an in-store pickup rather than shipment. Alas, no in store pickups available because the phone isn’t out yet. Catch-22. 

Throughout the day, with numerous tries and calls (and disconnections) to Apple then AT&T and then Apple again, I still was not able to complete the purchase. The timer was ticking as the reservation as it was only good until noon on Saturday.  The phone queues were getting longer. Finally, at 6pm an AT&T representative went the extra step to test my account and write up extensive notes on the shared AT&T/Apple system. I was totally in the clear with AT&T. What made sense being I was buying the phone outright, was not leasing, using payment plans, or renewing a contract. So bizarre this was even happening. 

Time to call Apple again. 

This time the Apple representative said this was a known bug in the order system and they’d been working on it all afternoon. It should be fixed within an hour. This was 7pm on Friday night. When I went to bed a few hours later, it still wasn’t working. Letting go. It seemed that on every turn I made that this phone was not in the cards for me. That’s okay. It’s only a phone. 

5am. Saturday. One more try. Success!

And so, I have the Jet Black iPhone 7 Plus ordered and expected delivery the first week of October. In all, I probably spent 3-hours in hold queues and about an hour on the phone with different representatives explaining the situation. Way too much time, but I was committed (or maybe should be committed?). My mental attitude was pretty good throughout the process. I didn’t get angry, raise my voice, or regret anything I said to Apple or AT&T. That is a good sign of my mindfulness practice. It all worked out in the end, and I’m happy. And even if it hadn’t worked out, that too would have been fine. 

Jun 29

Evernote: Worth the Increased Cost?

App costs are out of control – they usually don’t charge enough for what they offer. Lately, we are seeing a trend toward increased costs and Software as a Service (SaaS) models for supporting software development. In general, this is a good trend because we should be paying for the real cost of development.

I am a firm believer in paying a fair price for a service or product, especially if it brings value to my daily workflow. And not just paying some minimal amount, such as $1 in the App Store, but truly paying developers for the work they do to create something useful. Most recently, a piece of software I use daily switched to a SaaS model rather than an outright purchase. I had to give TextExpander a good long reconsideration because the increase in cost was significant. It wasn’t until they lowered it, based on consumer feedback, that I decided to go with the annual payment plan at a slightly higher cost. Though other options for this exist, I do use TextExpander daily on my laptop and iPhone so it was mostly a no-brainer.

Now another piece of software that I use daily has increased their annual subscription plan by 35% – from $45/year to $70/year. That’s a big jump!

Evernote Logo / Brand

I’ve happily been using Evernote since 2008 (though it took a couple years to get it into my workflow) and began paying for a Premium Plan in 2012. I loved the tool so much, I offered workshops at Santa Barbara City College. Back in 2013, I had the good fortune to meet Phil Liben, co-founder of Evernote (and current Chairman) only to discover a person who is kind and passionate about being human and developing great software. So, it’s not just another software company.

Earlier this month I was at a conference and Evernote became super handy. I could snap a photo of a business card, have it recognize the contact fields, populate to LinkedIn, and let me send my contact information right back to the person’s card I just received. Super Awesome! The fact I can dump pretty much anything into the app and it can read, index, and make it searchable is of immense value. Every tweet I favorite gets dumped into Evernote. Entire webpages and articles can be added to Evernote with the web clipper – no more bookmarking needed. And did I mention that it’s all searchable? Immediate and consistent syncing between my iPhone, iPad, desktop, and laptop.

What to do? I use Evernote everyday and I would definitely miss it. Of course, there are several other options in this market space that could meet the same needs for a much lower cost – including free. My subscription isn’t up for renewal until December, so I have some time to decide.

Are you a paying Evernote customer? What are your plans for the future with this type of software?

Nov 16

The Technology Horse

The Winter Retreat begins today at Plum Village and in a dharma talk earlier this week, Thich Nhat Hanh makes some very powerful statements about technology as well as giving very specific instructions to those practicing in the Winter Retreat.

He uses the ancient story of a person traveling on horseback to ask the question who is in charge of our direction. Thay suggest that the horse is technology and many people are being driven by technology and we are not in control.

One of the more powerful sentiments he shares is:  For the practitioner, if we are doing it exactly like the people in the world then we may not be able to help the people in the world. No email and no Internet and no Facebook can be attractive and to allow us to become a real practitioner. It can be an awakening.

For those who know me, they know I am definitely a technologist. I value technology and believe it can solve many problems. I also value our practice and as an Order of Interbeing member see we should continue to experiment with our practice. That is what we are asked to do.

Thay gives very specific instructions to the monastics: No email. No Facebook. Turn in your computer to the office. How do these instructions apply for the lay practitioner looking to deepen practice during this retreat and yet continue to live and participate in the world?

I do not fear nor suffer from the thought of not using Facebook, Twitterapp.net, LinkedIn for a 3-month period. I am reflecting on how I might use this as an opportunity for me to practice differently. With my work, I am required to use email, and yet there is also opportunity here too. For example, maybe I only check my personal email on certain days or certain hours. Though I can’t attend the 90-day retreat, each winter retreat season I have set an aspiration for my practice. No decision for this winter has been made yet but I’m thinking.

Listen to the talk (it’s not that long) and then share you’re own reflections on what the Teacher is suggesting.

Feb 24

Mindfulness and Social Media: Shifting Perspectives

One of the results from the past few weeks of mindfulness practice, first a few days at Deer Park and now a few days at the Wisdom 2.0 conference, has been a looking deeply at my social media presence. I love the technology and am relatively active on several networks. I heavily use Twitter and app.net. A moderate user of Google+ and Facebook. And a very light user of LinkedIn.

In all cases, I have practiced being mindful about the content I share and have the hope of cultivating positive relationships. It has served me well over the past 6-7 years of regular sharing. I have taught full semester courses and workshops on social media and it has therefore contribute directly to my livelihood. I have found new friends and I also believe has served as a platform to share the practice of mindfulness and meditation. This is all good and I love playing with the technology.

Continue reading

Feb 22

All This Relates to Everything

This is what Ev of Twitter fame said during his interview with Soren Gordhamer from the stage of Wisdom 2.0 conference in San Francisco – all this relates to everything. Brilliance in five words. Wisdom 2.0 is a tech conference, but it’s not. It’s business conference, but it’s not. It’s a wisdom gathering, a dharma talk, a practice, and a community.

Ev was talking about mindfully building a company from the ground up without really talking much about his new company called Obvious. He talked about meditation practice, about building culture, and about using Holacracy within the new company. This is something to explore and learn more about.

The day began with Ev and got increasingly better. I’m sitting at the end of the day with a cup of coffee and an espresso feeling inspired and motivated; trying to digest all that I heard.

Receiving the dharma rain throughout the day from the likes of Padmasree Warrior (CTO for Cisco), Gopi Kallayil (Google), Jack Kornfield, Tony Schwartz (Energy Project), Pam Weiss (Appropriate Response), Jane Fulton Suri (IDEO), Bradley Horowitz (Google), Peter Deng (Facebook), Melissa Daimler (Twitter), Jon Kabat-Zinn, and a fantastic interview with Jeff Weiner (CEO of LinkedIn).

A few highlights that I’m left with to ponder include integrating mindful planning into my work day, discovering my True Job, and managing compassion. My thoughts go to how this can manifest at Santa Barbara City College in my capacity as the director for the Luria Library and soon-to-be Academic Senate President.

All this relates to everything indeed. My work as a dharma teacher, a parent, a partner, a mentor, a librarian, a colleague. Cultivating wisdom and compassion is my practice. I’m feeling the energy to focus on how I can share about being a mindful leader here on misc.joy even more. Please encourage and support me on this endeavor.

Dec 09

Experimenting With a More Sustainable Business

I think many of you know I’m a technologist and that I enjoy playing with the latest gadgets, apps, and social media options. According to a recent article (Big Data is not the new Oil) in the Harvard Business Review, “Our browsing habits, our conversations with friends, our movements and location — all of these things are being monetized.” This fall I’ve been giving app.net a try because it pushes me into a non-librarian community (mostly developers), allows me to see what developers are interested in creating, and demonstrates a more sustainable business model that aligns well with library values. This new company, less than six months old, is experimenting and I appreciate their efforts. It may look a lot like Twitter, but scratch under the surface and there is a great deal more. Find me on ADN.

What do you think?

Sep 16

Fall Beginnings and Time to Breathe

Students, thousands of them, fill all spaces in the library. Lines form to use computers and textbooks. All library staff are on their feet every moment the library is open to direct and support any need. Students come and go with alacrity, which is a joy to experience, and I smile to our role as a central place on campus. It’s the fall semester and, as I write this letter, we have just completed our third week. Finally there is a calming energy after so much activity. It’s the space between beginning and middle. To add to the huge number of students, we also went live with the WorldShare Management Services platform this semester (eight other California community college campuses are actively migrating, with a few more still in the works). It’s been a very full three weeks for us and I am certain that each of our campus libraries can share a similar story for the fall semester beginnings.

Continue reading

Sep 03

The First Week with OCLC’s WorldShare Management

The power was completely out for half the campus on the first day of the fall semester at Santa Barbara City College. The library, already a crowded place, was even more crowded than usual. We experienced our continued record capacity with over 5,000 students each of the first three days. The Luria Library also went live with our new library system from OCLC – WorldShare Management Services (WMS). How did the first week go with the new system? What did we learn? Continue reading