Categories
music

Music Wednesday

Five new music tracks for your Wednesday evening. It’s available as an Apple Music Playlist or individually below.

  1. Pictures by Ásgeir
    Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube
  2. The Kids Are Having None of It by Frazy Ford
    Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube
  3. Oceans by RY X & Ólafur Arnalds
    Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube
  4. Massive Oscillations by Waclaw Zimpel
    Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube
  5. Guardians of Earth by Sepulture
    Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube

Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

I’ve been suffering from some boredom lately. In some ways it’s a good thing, but it’s definitely not something I’m not very used too. When I came across this article by Neel Burton, I had to give it a read. He writes, “How might we, mere mortals, best cope with boredom?” in Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom.

A close follow up to the boredom, is the benefit of walking. Ferris Jabr explores this idea in Why Walking Helps Is Think. Just today I took a 3-mile walk without headphones and I was surprised at home much creativity arose.

Another topic that I’ve been living with has to do with liminal space. I’m definitely in between. Claudia Smith takes this to driving, parking lots, and hotel hallways. When her narrative takes the reader down Westheimer, I can completely envision the space having spent a few months in Houston last year. Check out In Between.

Some of the finest investigative journalism comes from The Intercept. This piece is a wake up call for the environmental movement, particularly in light of the current administration. Makes me feel some solidarity with those in Oregon struggling to make a difference. Read A Canadian Energy Company Bought an Oregon Sheriff’s Unit by Will Parish and Alleen Brown.

Illustration: Alex Petrowsky for The Intercept

If you like their work, you can donate.

The last piece today is food for thought. It’s a criticism of the left and how they’ve lost their way. It’s not all to agree with, but certainly enough to turn a head. Umair Haque writes, “When the left gives up on its fundamental values of gentleness, decency, humanity, friendship, expansiveness, curiousity — and replaces them with spite, rage, intimidation, hostility, conformity, and tribalism…in what way is it different from the hard right?” in It Was the Worst Decade for the Left Since the 1930s. How Come Nobody Much Noticed — or Cares?

I hope you enjoy these pieces as much as I did.

Kenley

Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

  1. This is an introductory article to a much longer report. REPORT: Hundreds Killed or Attacked in El Salvador After Being Deported From U.S. You can also read the entire report.
  2. From Yes Magazine, Black Farmers Embrace Practices of Climate Resiliency reveals what we can do in addressing the climate crisis.
  3. It’s Detroit! The Blackest City in the U.S. Is Facing an Environmental Justice Nightmare
  4. From today’s NYT, For Thousands of Years, Egypt Controlled the Nile. A New Dam Threatens That. It’s a good article, I only wish they’d spent more time on the climate aspects. One sentence in particular reached out to me: “Egypt’s population increases by one million people every six months — a soaring rate that the United Nations predicts will lead to water shortages by 2025. Rising sea levels threaten to nibble at Egypt’s low-lying coast and help push saltwater inland, spoiling fertile land. Increasingly volatile weather is another risk.”
Nile River
Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

Skip the Super Bowl and spend some time reading! ?

  1. What does sea level rise really look like? Read some data and analysis. Sea Level Rise: It’s Probably Worse Than You Think
  2. Written from the perspective of being Black in a time of climate change. 15 Years After Katrina, a Fight Against ‘the Jim Crow of Climate Change’ Rages on in the Gulf Coast
  3. My candidate for president is Bernie Sanders. A look at him, Biden and Warren. Only Sanders Can Undo Trump
  4. For the librarian and educator audience. The title says it all. Information Privilege and First-year Students: A Case Study from a First-year Seminar Course Using Access to Information as a Lens for Exploring Privilege
  5. A short but important essay on practicing Buddhism and being Black. Sweeping my Heart