Categories
Environment Reading

Sunday Reads

This week the primary focus is on climate justice. We begin with a working paper on transformative climate justice and end with a report on Extinction Rebellion. In between is a piece on COVID-19 the reopening of colleges and universities and an essay on squad wealth. Don’t know what that means, then definitely read that essay. I leave you with a podcast series recommendation on Indigenous languages in California.

Towards Transformative Climate Justice: Key Challenges and Future Directions for Research, a Working Paper published by the Institute of Development Studies in July 2020

It’s a long paper, but recommend reading the first 13-pages. “Mainstream discourses are increasingly framed around the recognition that climate change is fundamentally a question of justice, in terms of the responsibility for the problem and its mitigation; that vulnerabilities to the impacts of climate change are both a reflection of, and exacerbate, structural injustices; and that there will be residual impacts beyond the capacity to mitigate and adapt or what might be deemed ‘tolerable’ impacts.”

COVID-19 and the Racial Equity Implications of Reopening College and University Campuses by Shaun R. Harper published in American Journal of Education (August 2020).

“COVID-19 forced many colleges and universities to suspend in-person operations in spring 2020. Students and instructors abruptly shifted to virtual learning and teaching, and most employees began working remotely during the global pandemic. Presented in this article are 12 racial equity implications for federal and state policy makers, as well as higher education leaders, as they consider reopening campuses across the United States.”

Squad Wealth by Sam Hart, Toby Shorin, Laura Lotti and published by Other Internet, August 2020

“Squads have existed for thousands of years as vital forms of social and economic organization. Thanks to group chats and a wave of private online social platforms, squads are reemerging today as a potent cultural force that rejects a strictly individualist market philosophy. Squads play a key role not only in internet community dynamics but in emerging economic networks. Hawala, chit funds, chamas and other forms of P2P savings or credit associations are notable precursors to the kinds of financial relationships we anticipate decentralized cryptocurrency protocols will soon enable.”

Fuzzy graph is SQUAD SPACE, the network of inner-zones.
This fuzzy graph is SQUAD SPACE, the network of inner-zones where digital microcultures are born: group DMs, Discords, Slacks, Keybases. Memes forged in SQUAD SPACE bubble out into the “clearnet” above, pwning NPCs on the internet of beefs. SOURCE: https://otherinter.net

As the West Burns, the Trump Administration Races to Demolish Environmental Protections. By Sharon Lerner. Published in The Intercept on September 19, 2020.

Polluters and their agents in government want to finalize as many environmental rollbacks as possible before the presidential election. This article covers a review of the last four years and highlighting what is taking place today.

A New Climate Movement? Extinction Rebellion’s Activists in Profile by Clare Saunders, Brian Doherty, and Graeme Hayes. Report published by Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity in July 2020.

“Extinction Rebellion set out to mobilise a new generation of activists. As our data shows, they have in part succeeded: participants in Extinction Rebellion’s two major actions in London in 2019 had notably little prior experience of protest action, and we encountered many first- time activists. At the same time, however, our socio-demographic profile of XR’s activists in the UK reveals a broadly familiar kind of environmentalist: XR’s activists are typically highly-educated and middle- class (and though our survey did not explicitly ask this, white); they identify politically on the Left; and they consciously adopt multiple pro- environmental behaviours in the course of their everyday lives.”

Podcast Series

Language Keepers created by Emergence Magazine. Series was launched on September 1, 2020.

Three episodes have been released so far in this 6-part podcast series. “Adapted from our award-winning multimedia story, “Language Keepers,” this six-part podcast series explores the struggle for Indigenous language survival in California. Two centuries ago, as many as ninety languages and three hundred dialects were spoken in California; today, only half of these languages remain. In this series, we delve into the current state of four Indigenous languages which are among the most vulnerable in the world: Tolowa Dee-ni’, Karuk, Wukchumni, and Kawaiisu. Along this journey, we meet and learn from dedicated families and communities across the state who are working to revitalize their Native languages and cultures in order to pass them on to the next generation.”


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Categories
Justice Reading

Sunday Reads

For this week’s long reads, we explore the topics of racism against Chinese scientists, linguistics and race, applying democracy to climate change, the lockdown and public works (by Naomi Klein!), and California’s privacy ballot measure. Plus one recommended podcast. I hope you enjoy.

The U.S. Crackdown on Chinese American Researchers Endangers the Future of Science by Eileen Guo published in OneZero

“…the already strained relationship between the U.S. and China continued to deteriorate, worsening as the Obama era gave way to the Trump administration. Hundreds more Chinese American scientists have been scrutinized as a result. The U.S. maintains that it is doing so to protect against the threat of Chinese espionage, an argument it has maintained for decades. But a growing network of advocates and scientists fear that the FBI is targeting scientists based on racial discrimination, and that is not only destroying the livelihoods of Chinese American scientists but also damaging American science output as well.”

Why the term “BIPOC” is so complicated, explained by linguists by Constance Grady published in Vox

“There’s this anxiety over saying the wrong thing,” says deandre miles-hercules, a PhD linguistics student who focuses on sociocultural linguistic research on race, gender, and sexuality. “And so instead of maybe doing a little research, understanding the history and the different semantic valences of a particular term to decide for yourself, or to understand the appropriateness of a use in a particular context, people generally go, ‘Tell me the word, and I will use the word.’ They’re not interested in learning things about the history of the term, or the context in which it’s appropriate.”

Improving Democracy for the Future: Why Democracy Can Handle Climate Change by Daniel J. Fiorino published in E-International Relations

“Climate change is a complex challenge, the largest collective action problem in history, and a classic illustration of the concept of a wicked problem. It is distinctive in many ways: unlike most forms of air or water pollution, the effects are not immediately obvious; harms occur mostly in the future, with a perceived temporal mismatch of costs and benefits. There is good reason to believe, however, that democracies overall are more suited to handling climate change than their authoritarian counterparts.”

A group of men planting trees during a Civilian Conservation Corps project on the Nett Lake Reservation in Minnesota. Photo: MPI/Getty Images

How Not to Lose the Lockdown Generation by Naomi Klein published in The Intercept

“As in the 1930s, this generation is already being referred to as a “lost generation” — but compared to the Great Depression, almost nothing is being done to find them, certainly not at the governmental level in the U.S. There are no ambitious and creative programs being designed to offer steady income beyond expanded summer job programs, and nothing designed to arm them with useful skills for the Covid and climate change era. All Washington has offered is a temporary break on student loan repayments, set to expire this fall.”

Why EFF Doesn’t Support California Proposition 24 by Lee Tien, Adam Schwartz, and Hayley Tsukayama published by Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)

California voters need to read this article. This November, Californians will be called upon to vote on a ballot initiative called the California Privacy Rights Act, or Proposition 24. EFF does not support it; nor does EFF oppose it.

Podcast

Seen on Radio: Seeing White (14-part series)

Where did the notion of “whiteness” come from? What does it mean? What is whiteness for? Scene on Radio host and producer John Biewen took a deep dive into these questions, along with an array of leading scholars and regular guest Dr. Chenjerai Kumanyika, in this fourteen-part documentary series, released between February and August 2017. The series editor is Loretta Williams.

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Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

Long Reads

Creation in Confinement: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration
By Nicole R. Fleetwood

“In popular entertainment, journalism, and documentaries, images of “life behind bars” fascinate, horrify, and titillate. They also offer a familiarity with prison as a cornerstone institution of modern life, but one that the majority of people never enter. The nonincarcerated public comes to recognize prison and the people in prison almost exclusively through a set of rehearsed images created by the state and by nonincarcerated image-makers—images like arrest photos, mug shots, the minimal furnishings of the prison cell, fortress-like walls, barbed wire, bars, metal doors, and the executioner’s chair.”

Russell Craig: Self Portrait, 2016

Russell Craig/Photo by Kisha Bari, provided by the Soze Agency
Russell Craig: Self Portrait, 2016
Russell Craig/Photo by Kisha Bari, provided by the Soze Agency

The datafication of teaching in Higher Education: critical issues and perspectives
By Ben Williamson, Sian Bayne & Suellen Shay

“Although ‘datafication’ – the rendering of social and natural worlds in machine-readable digital format – has most clearly manifested in the commercial domain, such as in online commerce (e.g. Amazon), social media (Facebook, Twitter), and online advertising (Google), it has quickly spread outwards to encompass a much wider range of services and sectors. These include, controversially, the use of facial recognition and predictive analytics in policing, algorithmic forms of welfare allocation, automated medical diagnosis, and – the subject of this special issue – the datafication of education.”

Why climate change is a pandemic in slow motion (and what that can teach us)
By Rob Wijnberg

“If this time is showing us anything, it’s this: we are able to transform society on a global scale in order to protect ourselves from danger. Now is the time to solve not just one crisis, but two at the same time.”

Short Reads

Beyond Rights: COVID—19, Conservatives and the Responsibilities of American Christianity
By David C. McDuffie

“In claiming religious freedom as a justification to act contrary to public health advice, some conservative Christian leaders in the United States are choosing to risk American lives so that their congregations can attend to their spiritual needs. Though most Christian communities have suspended traditional worship in adherence of social distancing guidelines, David C. McDuffie sees the defiant behaviour of the minority as rooted in a common supernatural understanding of Christian duty.”

We’re Still Living and Dying in the Slaveholders’ Republic
By Ibram X. Kendi

“Slaveholders disavowed a state that secured any form of communal freedom—the freedom of the community from slavery, from disenfranchisement, from exploitation, from poverty, from all the demeaning and silencing and killing. The freedom from. The freedom from harm. Which is to say, in coronavirus terms, the freedom from infection.”

How Serbian activists started a nationwide anti-authoritarian protest during COVID-19 lockdown
By Miloš Budimir

What began as a nightly cheer for healthcare workers has inspired thousands of people to bang pots and pans, blow whistles and blast music to protest Serbia’s ruling regime.

The COVID Crisis Is Reinforcing the Hunger Industrial Complex
By Andrew Fisher

“The existence of this unholy alliance poses the fundamental question of: “Why end hunger when anti-hunger work is so profitable to all parties?” Through supporting anti-hunger organizations, corporations reduce their labor costs, garbage disposal fees, and tax bills while building their reputations as socially responsible firms.”

Is Our War With The Environment Leading To Pandemics?
By Fiona Armstrong, Anthony Capon And Ro McFarlane

“It might be clear to readers here that human health depends on healthy ecosystems. But this is rarely considered in policy decisions on projects that affect natural ecosystems – such as land clearing, major energy or transport infrastructure projects and industrial-scale farming.”

BONUS – Videos

Life-Making, Capitalism and the Pandemic: Feminist Ideas about Women’s Work with Susan Ferguson and Tithi Bhattacharya

Martin Luther King, Jr. on Income Inequality and Redistribution of Wealth + James Baldwin

Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

This week I was tested for COVID-19 because I had a few of the symptoms associated with the virus. It took 3-days to get the results and I’m happy to share it came back negative. Therefore, the first two articles are about COVID.

COVID Test Results

Most of us have received vaccinations at some point in our lives. If we’ve traveled, you may have taken additional vaccinations. No vaccine has been created in less than four years (mumps in 1963-1967). The long read on the front page of today’s New York Times offers insight into the complexity of vaccines. Profits and Pride at Stake, Race to Vaccine Intensifies.

The next article takes a unique deeper look at COVID-19 as it relates to quantum phenomena. The article offers two contrasting future scenarios – Surveillance capitalism and Ecological and social emancipation. We look at the spiritual sphere, social sphere, and political sphere. Searching for the Anti-Virus | Covid-19 as Quantum Phenomenon.

I’ve long known the Amish shun traditional health insurance. And because some Mennonites (my background) also shun insurance, I was very interested in reading this article. If you are remotely curious how The Amish handle healthcare, then this article is for you. One can see the benefits of community-based care that other communities could likewise benefit from. The Amish Health Care System.

This next one is a history essay. As an undergrad, I received my degree in History and typically enjoy reading these types of essays. It is also important for anyone working in social justice as we look at the deportation of native peoples on Turtle Island. It also carries present-day implications, especially in light of the Navajo Nation being among the highest infection rates in North America. Indian Removal.

My last piece is a few years old (2015) and primarily for library nerds. It’s short too! “Databases embody the exclusionary nature of academic discourse. Students are on the outside, in search boxes, using natural language that the database most likely won’t understand. On the inside of the databases are millions of articles written by experts.” Covers gatekeeping, socioeconomic status, and justice within the realm of academic discourse. Smashing the Gates of Academic Discourse.

Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

Normally this semi-weekly post will include 4-5 long reads to enjoy. This week I offer only one. It’s definitely a long read and even more definitely worth your time. Please read.

The Coronation by Charles Eisenstein. It’s about the coronavirus but so so much more.