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Sunday Reads

Long Reads

An Aesthetic of Blackness: Strange and Oppositional
by bell hooks

As artist and critic, I find compelling a radical aesthetic that seeks to uncover and restore links between art and revolutionary politics, particularly black liberation struggle, while offering an expansive critical foundation for aesthetic evaluation. Concern for the contemporary plight of black people necessitates that I interrogate my work to see if it functions as a force that promotes the development of critical consciousness and resistance movement.

Placial Justice: Restoring Rehabilitation and Correctional Legitimacy Through Architectural Design
By Victor J. St. John

If we must live with jails and prisons, which in my view is debatable, then the author suggests we use affective architecture to increase perceptions of justice, fairness, and positivity in criminal justice buildings.

Mass Incarceration Poses a Uniquely American Risk in the Coronavirus Pandemic
By Alice Speri

The fragmentation of the U.S. criminal justice system — a sprawling, decentralized bureaucracy with thousands of jurisdictions and powerholders — has long served to hide the full cost of mass incarceration. Comprehensive data on those the U.S. deprives of their freedom is virtually impossible to obtain in a timely fashion, if at all. The coronavirus crisis has laid bare this systemic failure more than ever. The country’s more than 3,000 jails, in particular, function like fiefdoms. While state corrections departments oversee prisons, and the Bureau of Prisons runs federal facilities, jails operate under the authority of thousands of local officials. Only a handful of states collect data from their jails.

Isaac Kasamani/AFP via Getty Images

Fighting the ghost
By Harriet Salem

This article was published in Delayed Gratification before the COVID crisis was a pandemic. The subject is Ebola and vaccination development. Reading this in light of COVID is very interesting and may point to some future directions. “In November 2019 a highly effective vaccine against Ebola was cleared for use by the European Commission. But as Harriet Salem found out on the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda, huge obstacles remain on the path to beating this horrifying disease.”

‘You’re Fired!’ Retrotopian Desire and Right-Wing Class Politics
By Simon Schleusener

This essay will explore the way in which the populist right has utilized the realms of popular culture and the media in its struggle for hegemony.1 Along these lines, I will focus on Donald Trump’s former reality show, The Apprentice, drawing attention to the show’s prefiguration of precisely the right-wing class politics that was in many ways constitutive of Trump’s election as president – and which is still one of the key features of Trumpism today. In the course of the essay, I will also analyze certain facets of the online culture wars (cf. Nagle 2017), particularly examining right-wing efforts to pit feminists and working-class men against each other.

State Surveillance: Exploiting Fear during the Pandemic Crisis?
By Kirsten Hillebrand

During the pandemic crisis, state surveillance measures violated citizens’ privacy rights to track the virus spread. Little civic protest resulted—“safety first”? Indeed, many measures were implemented during the crisis without ever having been discussed in advance of the event of a crisis, which may raise ethical considerations, as individual consent to surveillance may change while experiencing fear.

Shorter Reads

Free Up the Prisoners
Anis Shivani

Why immigrant advocates should move from reform of prisons to abolition. And, In Migrating to Prison, Cesar Cuauhtémoc García Hernández puts both the financial and political motives for the explosive rise of immigration imprisonment into broader context. Migrating to Prison makes the persuasive case that the astronomical boom in imprisonment of immigrants stems from exactly the same root causes, both financial and political, as the dramatic escalation in mass incarceration. The case for abolition of prisons in general and immigrant prisons in particular rests on the same grounds.

For us to heal, we must be willing to not fear, fear.
By Irene Lyon

Fear is a biological and survival necessity. The cascade of neurochemical reactions lets us know, at lightning speed, that something is not right. Nature designed fear with speediness in mind. To understand how we embed the biological message that fear is to be feared and that fear is supposed to be scary, it’s important to understand how early life experiences, usually traumatic ones, trap fear.

Now Is the Time to Take Radical Steps Toward Housing Equity
By Chris Tittle

The current pandemic and economic crisis reveals in new ways just how cruel the private housing market can be. In April, one third of all renters could not pay rent—and 20 million more people have filed for unemployment since then. Research by the Eviction Lab shows how damaging eviction has always been to families and communities – evictions during COVID-19 might effectively amount to a death sentence for some people.

Bonus Material

If you just need something beautiful and kind, then enjoy this performance by Ryuichi Sakamoto. Be sure to turn on subtitles/captions so you get the translation from Japanese.

Ryuichi Sakamoto: Playing the Piano for the Isolated
Performed on April 2, 2020 in Tokyo
Published on YouTube on May 16, 2020

Categories
Politics Reading Technology

Sunday Reads

Hello friends. We’ve been spending a lot of time in our homes these past weeks. It feels disruptive. Unsettled. I hope you find these articles interesting.

One of my favorite places to read is The Intercept. They focus on investigative journalism. Today I will be spending 5-hours on Zoom calls. And since Zoom has been in the news a great deal lately, this article takes a deep dive into some technical aspects of the tool. Did you know they’ve gone from about 10m users to over 300m users in the last few weeks? Yikes! Read Zoom’s Encryption is “Not Suited for Secrets” and has Surprising Links to China, Researchers Discover.

A short article from Behavioral Scientist on why social distancing can feel so difficult and how we can improve upon it. Increasing Social Connection While “Social Distancing”

Yes, we’re still in the middle of an election for president. This article from Current Affairs takes a long look at both Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. It actually has something to say for people in both camps. It’s long. Everything Has Changed Overnight.

For the nerds and librarians: Wikipedia Is the Last Best Place on the Internet. A fun and interesting read from Wired.

Back in the 80s, the only solution for getting sober was going to Alcoholics Anonymous. Today, there is a plethora of solutions such as Refuge Recovery, Celebrate Recovery, and SMART Recovery. To name a few. But which one really works? This article in the New York Times tries to answer that question in Alcoholics Anonymous vs. Other Approaches: The Evidence Is Now In.

Grab a cup of coffee and happy reading.
Kenley

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