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Reading

Sunday Reads

I’ve been suffering from some boredom lately. In some ways it’s a good thing, but it’s definitely not something I’m not very used too. When I came across this article by Neel Burton, I had to give it a read. He writes, “How might we, mere mortals, best cope with boredom?” in Boredom is but a window to a sunny day beyond the gloom.

A close follow up to the boredom, is the benefit of walking. Ferris Jabr explores this idea in Why Walking Helps Is Think. Just today I took a 3-mile walk without headphones and I was surprised at home much creativity arose.

Another topic that I’ve been living with has to do with liminal space. I’m definitely in between. Claudia Smith takes this to driving, parking lots, and hotel hallways. When her narrative takes the reader down Westheimer, I can completely envision the space having spent a few months in Houston last year. Check out In Between.

Some of the finest investigative journalism comes from The Intercept. This piece is a wake up call for the environmental movement, particularly in light of the current administration. Makes me feel some solidarity with those in Oregon struggling to make a difference. Read A Canadian Energy Company Bought an Oregon Sheriff’s Unit by Will Parish and Alleen Brown.

Illustration: Alex Petrowsky for The Intercept

If you like their work, you can donate.

The last piece today is food for thought. It’s a criticism of the left and how they’ve lost their way. It’s not all to agree with, but certainly enough to turn a head. Umair Haque writes, “When the left gives up on its fundamental values of gentleness, decency, humanity, friendship, expansiveness, curiousity — and replaces them with spite, rage, intimidation, hostility, conformity, and tribalism…in what way is it different from the hard right?” in It Was the Worst Decade for the Left Since the 1930s. How Come Nobody Much Noticed — or Cares?

I hope you enjoy these pieces as much as I did.

Kenley

Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

  1. This is an introductory article to a much longer report. REPORT: Hundreds Killed or Attacked in El Salvador After Being Deported From U.S. You can also read the entire report.
  2. From Yes Magazine, Black Farmers Embrace Practices of Climate Resiliency reveals what we can do in addressing the climate crisis.
  3. It’s Detroit! The Blackest City in the U.S. Is Facing an Environmental Justice Nightmare
  4. From today’s NYT, For Thousands of Years, Egypt Controlled the Nile. A New Dam Threatens That. It’s a good article, I only wish they’d spent more time on the climate aspects. One sentence in particular reached out to me: “Egypt’s population increases by one million people every six months — a soaring rate that the United Nations predicts will lead to water shortages by 2025. Rising sea levels threaten to nibble at Egypt’s low-lying coast and help push saltwater inland, spoiling fertile land. Increasingly volatile weather is another risk.”
Nile River
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Reading

Sunday Reads

Skip the Super Bowl and spend some time reading! ?

  1. What does sea level rise really look like? Read some data and analysis. Sea Level Rise: It’s Probably Worse Than You Think
  2. Written from the perspective of being Black in a time of climate change. 15 Years After Katrina, a Fight Against ‘the Jim Crow of Climate Change’ Rages on in the Gulf Coast
  3. My candidate for president is Bernie Sanders. A look at him, Biden and Warren. Only Sanders Can Undo Trump
  4. For the librarian and educator audience. The title says it all. Information Privilege and First-year Students: A Case Study from a First-year Seminar Course Using Access to Information as a Lens for Exploring Privilege
  5. A short but important essay on practicing Buddhism and being Black. Sweeping my Heart

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Reading

Sunday Reads (2020-01-12)

This first piece is a great read on public discourse and tech monopolies. I’ve read and respected the author Cory Doctorow for many years. You should look for other work by him! – Inaction is a Form of Action

In The Merchants of Thirst, Peter Schwartzstein takes us to Nepal to discover how difficult and costly it is for people to receive water. The dire nature should be a wake-up call for everyone.

This third piece was of particular interest to me because I know Marc Benioff. We can ask the question: is there such a thing as a good billionaire? Chris Colin wrote for Wired magazine The Gospel of Wealth According to Marc Benioff.

My final read for the day is a shorter piece from the NYT opinion pages. Talk Less. Listen More. Here’s How. by Kate Murphy digs into what it means to listen.

Gold bars
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Reading

Sunday Reads (2020-01-05)

The long reads for this week cover the spectrum from autism, ethics, hate, peace, to communication. I hope you can enjoy one or two of these reads.

  1. As a parent of an autistic person and also a person with Autistic traits myself, I really appreciated Autism Gives Me Superpowers because it helps to cultivate empathy and a deeper understanding.
  2. Over the past several years, the fantastic research of ProPublica brought a series of articles on Hate. In What We Found in Three Years of Documenting Hate: A Letter to Our Partners, we can see an overview and links to all the resources in one place.
  3. Primarily from the Vajrayana tradition, Ethical Conduct Is the Essence of Dharma Practice takes a deep dive into ethics in Buddhism. Applicable for all traditions.
  4. How we communicate in the workplace or within a large organization, such as Plum Village, Basecamp leads the way with The Basecamp Guide to Internal Communication. Applicable for everyone, regardless of communication tool.
  5. Sometimes it feels truly impossible to practice interbeing and to be a true pacifist. We are so deeply ingrained in the language of violence and war, even when working in the social justice arena. Charles Eisenstein continues to inspire with his Building a Peace Narrative lecture (available both as text and video).
  6. In Buddhism, we often work with mentors or teachers to help us on the path. Each of us may be both a student and a teacher. In The Teacher-Student Relationship, the reader explores more deeply these relationships.

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Reading

Sunday Reads (2019-12-29)

  1. A great piece that talks about why Twitter has been good for people of color. Twitter Made Us Better.
  2. Studying digital politics and online activism. On Digital Disinformation and Democratic Myths
  3. Another example of Trump tearing down long-held environment laws. A Trump Policy ‘Clarification’ All but Ends Punishment for Bird Deaths
  4. Something on topic for me this year. What ‘Harry Potter’ Teaches Us About Mental Illness and Empathy
  5. A positive story about my former City, and on a topic that I love. San Francisco’s Sci-Fi Renaissance
  6. How to Start Being Kinder to Yourself
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Reading

Sunday Reads (2019-12-22)

Settle in for a few long reads of interest this week.

  1. Excellent piece on how we teach writing to students. I found it thoughtful and reflective. Good for anyone who teaches writing or uses writing in their classroom – Is Writing to Text the Only “High-Quality” Curriculum?
  2. A local (Ojai) piece on the ongoing journey of fires, dams, history and floods – Matilija Hot Springs to be leveled
  3. A deep discussion on mental health and Buddhism from a master. From 1975!? – Make Your Mind an Ocean
  4. This one is definitely making the rounds and I encourage everyone to take the time a read this investigative piece from The NY Times – Twelve Million Phones, One Dataset, Zero Privacy
  5. Another great investigative piece on where fascism lives both in America and internationally – Transnational White Terror: Exposing Atomwaffen And The Iron March Networks
  6. A short piece for those teaching mindfulness – Why Mindfulness And Trauma-Informed Teaching Don’t Always Go Together