Categories
Environment Reading

Sunday Reads

This week the primary focus is on climate justice. We begin with a working paper on transformative climate justice and end with a report on Extinction Rebellion. In between is a piece on COVID-19 the reopening of colleges and universities and an essay on squad wealth. Don’t know what that means, then definitely read that essay. I leave you with a podcast series recommendation on Indigenous languages in California.

Towards Transformative Climate Justice: Key Challenges and Future Directions for Research, a Working Paper published by the Institute of Development Studies in July 2020

It’s a long paper, but recommend reading the first 13-pages. “Mainstream discourses are increasingly framed around the recognition that climate change is fundamentally a question of justice, in terms of the responsibility for the problem and its mitigation; that vulnerabilities to the impacts of climate change are both a reflection of, and exacerbate, structural injustices; and that there will be residual impacts beyond the capacity to mitigate and adapt or what might be deemed ‘tolerable’ impacts.”

COVID-19 and the Racial Equity Implications of Reopening College and University Campuses by Shaun R. Harper published in American Journal of Education (August 2020).

“COVID-19 forced many colleges and universities to suspend in-person operations in spring 2020. Students and instructors abruptly shifted to virtual learning and teaching, and most employees began working remotely during the global pandemic. Presented in this article are 12 racial equity implications for federal and state policy makers, as well as higher education leaders, as they consider reopening campuses across the United States.”

Squad Wealth by Sam Hart, Toby Shorin, Laura Lotti and published by Other Internet, August 2020

“Squads have existed for thousands of years as vital forms of social and economic organization. Thanks to group chats and a wave of private online social platforms, squads are reemerging today as a potent cultural force that rejects a strictly individualist market philosophy. Squads play a key role not only in internet community dynamics but in emerging economic networks. Hawala, chit funds, chamas and other forms of P2P savings or credit associations are notable precursors to the kinds of financial relationships we anticipate decentralized cryptocurrency protocols will soon enable.”

Fuzzy graph is SQUAD SPACE, the network of inner-zones.
This fuzzy graph is SQUAD SPACE, the network of inner-zones where digital microcultures are born: group DMs, Discords, Slacks, Keybases. Memes forged in SQUAD SPACE bubble out into the “clearnet” above, pwning NPCs on the internet of beefs. SOURCE: https://otherinter.net

As the West Burns, the Trump Administration Races to Demolish Environmental Protections. By Sharon Lerner. Published in The Intercept on September 19, 2020.

Polluters and their agents in government want to finalize as many environmental rollbacks as possible before the presidential election. This article covers a review of the last four years and highlighting what is taking place today.

A New Climate Movement? Extinction Rebellion’s Activists in Profile by Clare Saunders, Brian Doherty, and Graeme Hayes. Report published by Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity in July 2020.

“Extinction Rebellion set out to mobilise a new generation of activists. As our data shows, they have in part succeeded: participants in Extinction Rebellion’s two major actions in London in 2019 had notably little prior experience of protest action, and we encountered many first- time activists. At the same time, however, our socio-demographic profile of XR’s activists in the UK reveals a broadly familiar kind of environmentalist: XR’s activists are typically highly-educated and middle- class (and though our survey did not explicitly ask this, white); they identify politically on the Left; and they consciously adopt multiple pro- environmental behaviours in the course of their everyday lives.”

Podcast Series

Language Keepers created by Emergence Magazine. Series was launched on September 1, 2020.

Three episodes have been released so far in this 6-part podcast series. “Adapted from our award-winning multimedia story, “Language Keepers,” this six-part podcast series explores the struggle for Indigenous language survival in California. Two centuries ago, as many as ninety languages and three hundred dialects were spoken in California; today, only half of these languages remain. In this series, we delve into the current state of four Indigenous languages which are among the most vulnerable in the world: Tolowa Dee-ni’, Karuk, Wukchumni, and Kawaiisu. Along this journey, we meet and learn from dedicated families and communities across the state who are working to revitalize their Native languages and cultures in order to pass them on to the next generation.”


By signing up above, you will receive an email notification for new posts on this blog. You can remove yourself at any time. – Kenley

Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads

Five articles and two excellent podcasts for your review.

The Challenge of Equity in California’s Municipal Climate Action Plans by Hillary Angelo, Key MacFarlane, and James Sirigotis a report from the Institute for Social Transformation at UCSC.

This report analyzes the inclusion and operationalization
of “equity” in 170 California cities’ and counties’ Climate Action Plans (CAPs). California’s municipal climate action planning landscape is unique for both its size and diversity, as aggressive statewide environmental legislation has put unique pressure on all cities—even (or especially) small and less well-resourced ones—to adopt climate/emissions plans.

Insurrection in the Eye of the Beholder by Hala Allan published in the Baffler.

The Insurrection Act. Its invocation is enmeshed with this country’s long history of racial injustice: “insurrection” has been defined, in practice, as either rebellion against slave power or ongoing racial injustice, or as resistance to federal laws mandating civil rights and integration.

The Inequality Engine by Geoff Mann published in the London Review of Books.

Piketty’s follow-up, Capital and Ideology, is a massive, globe and history-spanning attempt to figure out what’s inside the ‘black box’ that Capital in the 21st Century left unexamined. What makes it possible for inequality to persist, let alone get worse? Why don’t governments do anything about it? And since they so often don’t, why doesn’t runaway inequality provoke the mass resistance that might force them to?

Extinction Event by Simon Torracinta published in n+1 Magazine.

What can we expect in the fall? As pandemic lockdown orders extend further and further through the spring, there has been a great deal of speculation about how or whether college education would proceed. Rumors floated at different schools of cancelled or remote semesters, even of months-long adjustments to the academic calendar. But for all but the richest universities, the conclusion has never truly been in doubt.

Bonus Material

Ruth Wilson Gilmore Makes the Case for Abolition interviewed on Intercepted Podcast.

The movement to defund the police in the United States is gaining unprecedented momentum as protests continue across the globe. This 2-part series taking with Ruth Wilson Gilmore is insightful and motivating. Iconic geographer and abolitionist Ruth Wilson Gilmore, author of “Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California.” Gilmore is one of the world’s preeminent scholars on prisons and the machinery of carceral punishment and policing.

Floodlines: City of New Orleans

Floodlines: The story of an unnatural disaster hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II from The Atlantic.

This 8-part exploration of Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans offers a clear and complete narrative on what actually happened in 2005. Very well worth the time.

Categories
General Politics

A Bitter Harvest: California, Marijuana, and the New Jim Crow

I highly recommend listening to this radio show exploring themes of racism, drugs and legal disenfranchisement. The discussion centers around California marijuana growing and the apparent inequities between white pot farmers and and widespread incarceration of African-American men throughout America. It’s a thoughtful discussion and one worthy of hearing and considering, particularly for white Americans. The show was ably created and produced by my step-brother Chris Moore-Backman.

Listen or Download

Categories
Buddhism Family Politics

Love, Equal Rights, and Gay Marriage

Today I am struggling. In fact, I have been struggling since before the national election. I don’t understand the opposition to gay marriage and how Proposition 8 passed in California.

Growing up, as a Mennonite, I was taught that love was of the highest nature. I see Christ as a true revolutionary who reached out to the poor, the destitute, and the outcasts and he did so without judgment and with pure love in his heart. In the past, I have written that I am a potential Christian and a practicing Buddhist. Today, after the election season in California, much of my bitterness and unhappiness with my Christian roots have been watered and I am not so positive about this potentiality. This is my struggle today. In fact, it is so powerful that I am experiencing resistance to attending another marriage ceremony between two people who may have voted in favor of Proposition 8. This is difficult.

As a practicing Buddhist, I aim to seek understanding and to have compassion. Writing here I am trying to reach some understanding and compassion for my Christian brothers and sisters who have taken the stand to discriminate against a group of people for their sexuality. I know good Christians, people right here in my town, and they are good people. And yet, they have taken the stand of not embracing, not loving. It seems fundamentally wrong, and in opposition to the teachings of Christ, to not allow two people who love each other the right to join in marriage. When I married Leslie in 1995, we did so to share our love with our friends and family, to give the relationship a bit more sanctity, more seriousness, and make a lifetime commitment. Why wouldn’t we want this for gay couples? Aside from the high divorce rate in marriages, I see nothing but positive outcomes to allowing marriage between two people who love each other. It recognizes and honors the love between two people.