Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads (2020-01-05)

The long reads for this week cover the spectrum from autism, ethics, hate, peace, to communication. I hope you can enjoy one or two of these reads.

  1. As a parent of an autistic person and also a person with Autistic traits myself, I really appreciated Autism Gives Me Superpowers because it helps to cultivate empathy and a deeper understanding.
  2. Over the past several years, the fantastic research of ProPublica brought a series of articles on Hate. In What We Found in Three Years of Documenting Hate: A Letter to Our Partners, we can see an overview and links to all the resources in one place.
  3. Primarily from the Vajrayana tradition, Ethical Conduct Is the Essence of Dharma Practice takes a deep dive into ethics in Buddhism. Applicable for all traditions.
  4. How we communicate in the workplace or within a large organization, such as Plum Village, Basecamp leads the way with The Basecamp Guide to Internal Communication. Applicable for everyone, regardless of communication tool.
  5. Sometimes it feels truly impossible to practice interbeing and to be a true pacifist. We are so deeply ingrained in the language of violence and war, even when working in the social justice arena. Charles Eisenstein continues to inspire with his Building a Peace Narrative lecture (available both as text and video).
  6. In Buddhism, we often work with mentors or teachers to help us on the path. Each of us may be both a student and a teacher. In The Teacher-Student Relationship, the reader explores more deeply these relationships.

Categories
Dharma

Possibility for the Beloved Community

I’ve noticed in myself that I have awareness of the tragedy that happened today, it’s filling my streams, but I have no desire to dwell there or debate the various issues. Seeing the headlines is enough.

I’d like to start a discussion on building the Beloved Community. I think it can applied to so many aspects of suffering, violence, peace, justice, and compassion. Martin Luther King saw this wisdom as it related to racial injustice and violence in the United States and the war in Vietnam. His vision for a beloved community still resonates today and hasn’t been fully manifested. As written on the King Center site, the beloved community is an “achievable goal that could be attained by a critical mass of people committed to and trained in the philosophy and methods of nonviolence.”

We can try responding by cultivating our own beloved community. Strength resides in our connections.

What do you think?

Categories
Buddhism Ojai

International Day of Peace

Established in 2002  1982, today is the United Nations’ International Day of Peace. As a lifelong pacifist and peace activist, I see today as another opportunity to take action. Being peaceful in the time of war and turmoil is a very courageous act and often counter to how we are told to act and to respond. Being a pacifist does not mean being passive – it requires action and courage to stand up to violence. One such group that I support is the Nonviolent Peaceforce, an international organization that trains civilians to go into conflict areas to prevent death and destruction and protect human rights. Other groups, such as Fellowship of Reconciliation and Christian Peacemaker Teams do similar work.

Perhaps the easiest route to peace is to find peace within yourself. My teacher, Thich Nhat Hanh (Thay), is well known for his statements and actions on peace. He tries to keep things real simple by encouraging us to come back to ourselves and learn to live in peace each moment of daily life. I have been honored to practice with Thay for the past decade and to learn the practice of true peace. As a spiritual leader in my community, I have been asked to share a few minutes at an InterSpiritual Service that is part of Living Peace in Ojai. Instead of talking about peace, we will practice peace by using the following exercise. As Thay has said, “Even in the midst of suffering, it is possible to bring our awareness to the good qualities within yourself and allow them to manifest in your consciousness. Practice mindful breathing to remind yourself of your Buddha nature, of the great compassion and understanding in you.”