Categories
Politics Reading Technology

Sunday Reads

Hello friends. We’ve been spending a lot of time in our homes these past weeks. It feels disruptive. Unsettled. I hope you find these articles interesting.

One of my favorite places to read is The Intercept. They focus on investigative journalism. Today I will be spending 5-hours on Zoom calls. And since Zoom has been in the news a great deal lately, this article takes a deep dive into some technical aspects of the tool. Did you know they’ve gone from about 10m users to over 300m users in the last few weeks? Yikes! Read Zoom’s Encryption is “Not Suited for Secrets” and has Surprising Links to China, Researchers Discover.

A short article from Behavioral Scientist on why social distancing can feel so difficult and how we can improve upon it. Increasing Social Connection While “Social Distancing”

Yes, we’re still in the middle of an election for president. This article from Current Affairs takes a long look at both Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. It actually has something to say for people in both camps. It’s long. Everything Has Changed Overnight.

For the nerds and librarians: Wikipedia Is the Last Best Place on the Internet. A fun and interesting read from Wired.

Back in the 80s, the only solution for getting sober was going to Alcoholics Anonymous. Today, there is a plethora of solutions such as Refuge Recovery, Celebrate Recovery, and SMART Recovery. To name a few. But which one really works? This article in the New York Times tries to answer that question in Alcoholics Anonymous vs. Other Approaches: The Evidence Is Now In.

Grab a cup of coffee and happy reading.
Kenley

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Coffee and letter
Categories
Buddhism Dharma Family

Philip Seymour Hoffman and Me

Happiness, the End of Suffering, and Recovery

Forty-six. That’s not so old – young in fact. He and I are both 46, with young children, and in a long term relationship. We both got sober very young and then maintained that sobriety for many years. Mr. Hoffman made it 23-years, and I’m about to reach my 25th year. This is where the story diverges into disbelief, tragedy, and sadness. Philip Seymour Hoffman is dead from a drug overdose in his own house and a needle in his arm.

How does this happen? Why am I still here and he’s dead? These are the questions on my mind today.

What is clear to me is that success, fame, and fortune do not equal happiness and recovery. Further, many men and women in their forties die everyday. Many probably die from alcohol or drugs. We can’t really blame the heroin, though it is gnarly and deadly, because we know that the drug is just a symptom of a deeper suffering, a deeper sadness, and an inability to cope with reality.

Here’s what I know about happiness, the end of suffering, and recovery.