Categories
Environment Justice

Sunday Reads

White supremacy = Mother of climate crisis by Kritee Kanko in Boundless in Motion

One can’t deal with the climate emergency without facing racism head-on. If you ignore white supremacy, you ignore a fundamental enabler-engine of climate emergency. You forget colonialism, you forget what brought us to this point of ongoing sixth mass extinction.

Why Planting Trees Won’t Save Us by Jeff Goodell in Rolling Stone

If a climate solution sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Two new studies expose the magical thinking around the trillion trees initiative. Tree planting is also a key part of cap-and-trade schemes, which allow polluters to continue emitting CO2 if that CO2 can be offset (or absorbed) in other ways. In California, the cap-and-trade program has recognized 133 million tons of CO2 in benefits from forest carbon offset projects between 2013 and 2019.

Abolish Oil by Reinhold Martin in Places Journal

Oil abolition implies social transformation — a systemic change toward collective freedom. The Green New Deal points in its very name to a usable past for today’s climate politics. Inattention to the cunning of ‘oil’ as a system of domination risks reifying historical injustices.

Black Lives Matter, Protests, and Whiteness by by Jaime Caro-Morente Marta Caro-Olivares in Industrial Worker

“All Lives Matter” does not imply a humanistic position against the alleged violence of Black Lives Matter. It supposes to equalize the oppressor and the oppressed. It involves denying systemic racism, essentializing race, and accepting the status quo as the natural state of affairs. Standing side by side with violence against the Black population means standing side by side with the legacy of slavery and segregation.

Protesting Police Violence: A Race-Class Messaging Guide by Ian Haney Lopez

This messaging guide is written for progressive advocates, and the advice is consistent with our values. That said, the messages presented here are framed to appeal to a broad spectrum of people. They reflect lessons learned in our Race-Class Narrative Project, as well as in focus groups among Latinos taking place in May and June of 2020.

Powerhouse, Wheeler Dam, Alabama, Tennessee Valley Authority.
Powerhouse, Wheeler Dam, Alabama, Tennessee Valley Authority. [Library of Congress]
Categories
Reading

Sunday Reads (2020-01-05)

The long reads for this week cover the spectrum from autism, ethics, hate, peace, to communication. I hope you can enjoy one or two of these reads.

  1. As a parent of an autistic person and also a person with Autistic traits myself, I really appreciated Autism Gives Me Superpowers because it helps to cultivate empathy and a deeper understanding.
  2. Over the past several years, the fantastic research of ProPublica brought a series of articles on Hate. In What We Found in Three Years of Documenting Hate: A Letter to Our Partners, we can see an overview and links to all the resources in one place.
  3. Primarily from the Vajrayana tradition, Ethical Conduct Is the Essence of Dharma Practice takes a deep dive into ethics in Buddhism. Applicable for all traditions.
  4. How we communicate in the workplace or within a large organization, such as Plum Village, Basecamp leads the way with The Basecamp Guide to Internal Communication. Applicable for everyone, regardless of communication tool.
  5. Sometimes it feels truly impossible to practice interbeing and to be a true pacifist. We are so deeply ingrained in the language of violence and war, even when working in the social justice arena. Charles Eisenstein continues to inspire with his Building a Peace Narrative lecture (available both as text and video).
  6. In Buddhism, we often work with mentors or teachers to help us on the path. Each of us may be both a student and a teacher. In The Teacher-Student Relationship, the reader explores more deeply these relationships.

Categories
Dharma

Possibility for the Beloved Community

I’ve noticed in myself that I have awareness of the tragedy that happened today, it’s filling my streams, but I have no desire to dwell there or debate the various issues. Seeing the headlines is enough.

I’d like to start a discussion on building the Beloved Community. I think it can applied to so many aspects of suffering, violence, peace, justice, and compassion. Martin Luther King saw this wisdom as it related to racial injustice and violence in the United States and the war in Vietnam. His vision for a beloved community still resonates today and hasn’t been fully manifested. As written on the King Center site, the beloved community is an “achievable goal that could be attained by a critical mass of people committed to and trained in the philosophy and methods of nonviolence.”

We can try responding by cultivating our own beloved community. Strength resides in our connections.

What do you think?