Categories
Reading

Ten Books to Read

Here you will find a selection of the books I’ve read this year. The first five titles are non-fiction followed by five fiction titles. The fiction titles are predominately science fiction or fantasy but are easy crossovers for those who don’t typically read genre fiction. 

Our History is the Future Our History is the Future by Nick Estes 

The author of this book is a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe. We begin with the 2016 #NoDAPL movement in North Dakota but soon move through the history of settler colonialism and the hundreds of years of Native resistance that continues to this day. Estes places the reader right in the story and in the places of this long history. A very relevant read within todays environment. This book draws you to the present through the lens of history. 

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do by Dr. Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Dr. Eberhardt is a professor of psychology at Stanford University. You don’t have to be a racist to be biased. This is a book about unconscious bias and how it plays out in the lives of all people. Grounded in scientific and investigative work, we also read from the personal experiences of the author–a black woman in America. We discover the “tragic consequences of prejudice” and that’s not the fault of a few “bad apples.” A very readable and informative title. 

Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness: Practices for Safe and Transformative Healing Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness: Practices for Safe and Transformative Healing by Dr. David Treleaven

The author is an educator and psychotherapist whose work focuses on the intersection of trauma, mindfulness, and social justice. Rooted in research and scholarship, combined with personal stories and clinical methods, we are taken on a journal of trauma healing. The book is based around five principles – window of tolerance, shift attention to support stability, keep the body in mind, practice in relationship, and understand social context. It is in this last one where we take a deep dive into trauma events experienced by marginalized social groups. Get out your highlighter for this one. 

Between Earth and Empire: From the Necrocene to the Beloved Community Between Earth and Empire: From the Necrocene to the Beloved Community by John P. Clark 

Mr. Clark is an eco-communitarian anarchist writer, activist, and educator from New Orleans. He is professor emeritus of philosophy at Loyola University. This book is a collection of essays that explores empire, earth justice, indigenous struggles, and awakening our consciousness. His essays on Chiapas and Black Panthers are particularly enlightening. And as a resident of New Orleans, his insights into the racial aspects of Hurricane Katrina are clear and direct. For the awakening, we take a dive into Buddhism, Solstice, and Rumi. “The books shows that conventional approaches to global crisis on both the right and the left have succumbed to processes of denial and disavowal.” We need large-scale regeneration “rooted in communities of liberation and solidarity.” There is much here to ponder and also be inspired by. 

Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation by Andrew Marantz 

New Yorker staff writer, he spends several years in and out of extremist groups in the United States. All about the alt-right ‘news’ creators. The bulk of the story takes place leading up to the election of Trump. As a journalist, the story is engaging and easy to read even if we may be uncomfortable with some of the disclosures. Deeply researched through getting to know the people putting out the propaganda. At times you could tell the author was very uncomfortable with the work. Here you will learn about white supremacy, manipulation of social media, and about unregulated big tech. This book is disturbing. 

Agency Agency by William Gibson

Gibson is a well-established speculative fiction writer. Agency “is a ‘sequel and a prequel’ to his previous novel The Peripheral, reusing the technology from the novel to explore an alternative 2017 where Hillary Clinton won the 2016 Presidential Election.” There are two different plots lines, one set in 2017 and a second set in the post-apocalyptic 22nd century (where they are meddling in 2017). We also have a well-evolved AI system.

This is How You Lose the Time War This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone

Blue and Red are on opposite sides of war. A war fought through time. It is a story of treachery, of love, and of poetry. Written in the form of letters between to the two characters. It is a book to read slowly and savor the words, the imagery, and the tragedy of love and war. The book is a Hugo Award Nominee for Best Novella (2020), a Nebula Award for Best Novella (2019), and a Locus Award Nominee for Best Novella (2020). 

The Ten Thousand Doors of January The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

This story primarily takes place in the early 1900s in the northeast. The young January Scaller is growing up in a mansion while her father travels the world looking for curiosities. It is about her looking to find out who she is and what her place is in the world. The book evolves as a mystery as we learn more about her parents and the man she lives with in the mansion. We learn of secret doors that lead to love, adventure, and danger. A strange and beautiful tale. The book is a Hugo Award Nominee for Best Novel (2020), a Nebula Award Nominee for Best Novel (2019), and a Locus Award Nominee for Best First Novel (2020). 

A Memory Called Empire A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine

Political intrigue. Buried and exposed memory. A powerful empire and a small society with secret technology. All told through the voice of a young and skilled ambassador – Mahit Dmare. But there is more than one voice inside Mahit as we learn about a hidden technology secret. It is all at once a mystery, a story of empire, and also of love. Who will be saved? It is an “interstellar mystery adventure.” The book is a Hugo Award Nominee for Best Novel (2020), a. Nebula Award Nominee for Best Novel (2019), and a Locus Award Nominee for Best First Novel (2020).

Gideon the Ninth Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir 

The book tells the story of a snarky young Gideon and her childhood rival, the Reverend Daughter of The Ninth House. Technically there is space travel in this book, but 99% of the book takes place on one planet where members of each of the nine houses are put into play in a test of wits and skill. A true mystery and whodunit. If you don’t care for teenage snark, it might be a rough read. But it’s a fun book. The book is a Hugo Award Nominee for Best Novel (2020), a Nebula Award Nominee for Best Novel (2019) and a Locus Award Nominee for Best First Novel (2020). 

Categories
Justice Reading

Sunday Reads

Five articles this week covering climate, surveillance, big data, and racism.

Revolution or Ruin by Kai Heron and Jodi Dean in e-flux

Climate: “The state is a ready-made apparatus for responding to the climate crisis. It can operate at the scales necessary to develop and implement plans for reorganizing agriculture, transportation, housing, and production. It has the capacity to transform the energy sector. It is backed by a standing army. What if all that power were channeled by the many against the few on behalf of a just response to the climate crisis?”

Out of Time: The Case for Nationalizing the Fossil Fuel Industry by People’s Policy Institute

Climate: This is a very long report, but well worth the read. “Nationalization is one of the more straightforward ways to overcome many of the systemic hurdles that prevent meaningful action, allowing us to move towards decarbonization in a way that is planned, provides for workers, and supports communities. Leaving decisions about the life and death of current and future generations up to private enterprises beholden to shareholders has never been a viable option.”

The Loss Of Public Goods To Big Tech by Safiya Noble in Noema

Surveillance Capitalism: “Calls by Black Lives Matter and others to defund the police must include dismantling and outlawing the technologies of governments and law enforcement that exacerbate the conditions of racial and economic injustice. Investments in anti-democratic technologies come at an incredible cost to the public at a time when deeper investments should be made in public health, education, public media and abolitionist approaches in the tech sector.”

Police Surveilled George Floyd Protests With Help From Twitter-Affiliated Startup Dataminr by Sam Bittle in The Intercept

Surveillance: “But to some surveillance scholars, legal experts, and activists, there’s little doubt about what Dataminr is up to, and what Twitter is enabling, no matter what careful terminology they use. According to Brandi Collins-Dexter, a campaign director with the civil rights group Color of Change, Dataminr’s practices are an example of “if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck,” with regards to surveillance.”

When Proof Is Not Enough by Mimi Onuoha in FiveThirtyEight

Racism: “Data showing racism might be useful in clarifying the things we already know to be true, but it is far more limited in terms of shifting them. To those who have not experienced the ever more creative forms that structural racism can take, even when presented with evidence of racism, the world may still appear to be full of regular playing cards.”

Climate Lenin intervenes in Mann and Wainright’s Climate Leviathan diagram, from the eponymous 2018 book.
Categories
Environment Justice

Sunday Reads

White supremacy = Mother of climate crisis by Kritee Kanko in Boundless in Motion

One can’t deal with the climate emergency without facing racism head-on. If you ignore white supremacy, you ignore a fundamental enabler-engine of climate emergency. You forget colonialism, you forget what brought us to this point of ongoing sixth mass extinction.

Why Planting Trees Won’t Save Us by Jeff Goodell in Rolling Stone

If a climate solution sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Two new studies expose the magical thinking around the trillion trees initiative. Tree planting is also a key part of cap-and-trade schemes, which allow polluters to continue emitting CO2 if that CO2 can be offset (or absorbed) in other ways. In California, the cap-and-trade program has recognized 133 million tons of CO2 in benefits from forest carbon offset projects between 2013 and 2019.

Abolish Oil by Reinhold Martin in Places Journal

Oil abolition implies social transformation — a systemic change toward collective freedom. The Green New Deal points in its very name to a usable past for today’s climate politics. Inattention to the cunning of ‘oil’ as a system of domination risks reifying historical injustices.

Black Lives Matter, Protests, and Whiteness by by Jaime Caro-Morente Marta Caro-Olivares in Industrial Worker

“All Lives Matter” does not imply a humanistic position against the alleged violence of Black Lives Matter. It supposes to equalize the oppressor and the oppressed. It involves denying systemic racism, essentializing race, and accepting the status quo as the natural state of affairs. Standing side by side with violence against the Black population means standing side by side with the legacy of slavery and segregation.

Protesting Police Violence: A Race-Class Messaging Guide by Ian Haney Lopez

This messaging guide is written for progressive advocates, and the advice is consistent with our values. That said, the messages presented here are framed to appeal to a broad spectrum of people. They reflect lessons learned in our Race-Class Narrative Project, as well as in focus groups among Latinos taking place in May and June of 2020.

Powerhouse, Wheeler Dam, Alabama, Tennessee Valley Authority.
Powerhouse, Wheeler Dam, Alabama, Tennessee Valley Authority. [Library of Congress]
Categories
Environment Justice Reading

Sunday Reads

Four long reads worth your time. This week we begin with a discussion on being Asian American by Pulitzer Prize winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen. This is followed by a long essay on politics, nature, and the coronavirus. The next two uncover climate change issues in Ethiopia and Southwest United States. And we conclude with a short opinion piece on the relationship between climate change and dismantling white supremacy.

Asian Americans Are Still Caught in the Trap of the ‘Model Minority’ Stereotype. And It Creates Inequality for All by Viet Thanh Nguyen in Time

Throughout Asian-American history, Asian immigrants and their descendants have been offered the opportunity by both Black people and white people to choose sides in the Black-white racial divide, and we have far too often chosen the white side. And yet there have been vocal Asian Americans who have called for solidarity with Black people and other people of color, from the activist Yuri Kochiyama, who cradled a dying Malcolm X, to the activist Grace Lee Boggs, who settled in Detroit and engaged in serious, radical organizing and theorizing with her Black husband James Boggs.

From The Anthropocene To The Microbiocene by Tobias Rees in Noema

If you read only the first few paragraphs, you will be treated to a story of the pangolin. And then, “A key feature of nature according to the virus is interconnectedness: All organisms are inseparably interwoven with one another — and with the biosphere.” And lastly, “looked at from the perspective opened up by COVID-19, it appears that modern politics has been a tool invented to defend the illusion of the free-standing human as such. Essentially, modern politics has been a differentiation machine.”

Inside Ethiopia’s Endangered Wild-Coffee Forests by Jeff Koehler in Atlas Obscura

Solid story and beautiful pictures. “Today, wild Arabica’s greatest threat is climate change. Highly sensitive, it can only survive within a narrow band of conditions. Aaron Davis, a senior research leader at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the world’s foremost authority of coffee and climate change, has forecasted that the places where wild coffee can grow will decrease by 65 percent by 2080. That’s the best-case scenario. The worst-case showed a 99.7 percent reduction, with wild Arabica tree populations dropping by 40 to 99 percent.”

‘Megadrought’ and ‘Aridification’ — Understanding the New Language of a Warming World by Tara Lohan in The Revelator

“New research reveals a creeping, permanent dryness expanding across the United States. It’s much more than “drought,” and researchers hope more accurate descriptions will spur critical action. The current megadrought in the Southwest is defined not so much by declining precipitation — although that did have an effect too — but by increasing temperatures from climate change. That’s going to continue to climb as long as we keep burning greenhouse gases.”

If you care about the planet, you must dismantle white supremacy By Tamara Toles O’Laughlin in Grist

This one is a short read. “The reality is that the communities being battered by both the coronavirus and climate are also epicenters of over-policing, incarceration, and state-sanctioned violence. In every aspect of our lives, starting in our mothers’ wombs, we are systematically devalued. Black communities face the long-term effects of environmental racism, intentionally zoned into neighborhoods surrounded by factories, highways, pipelines, and compressor stations.”

Freshly picked coffee (the beans are inside these fruits) in the Mankira Forest, Kafa. Photo sourced from Atlas Obscura
Categories
Justice

“All Lives Matter” says Santa Barbara City College Trustee

When a Board Resolution called “Affirming our Commitment for Black and African American Students, Faculty and Staff” doesn’t pass unanimously (5-2), you know the college has a problem. And this is exactly what happened at my place of employment on June 25, 2020. I am angry that the continued racism and white supremacy is allowed to fester and grow. 

So what do you do when one district trustees says “all lives matter” and the other thinks “Black Lives Matter” means the college supports defunding the police? In my case, I write this blog post, plan to speak at the next Board of Trustees meeting, and to reach out to my Black colleagues.

These two trustees, Veronica Gallardo and Craig Nielsen, are an insult to Santa Barbara City College and to Black students, faculty, and staff. If I were a Black student, I’d definitely be looking for another college to attend. Over a period of years, these two trustees have consistently blocked the needs and voices of Black student and employees. They need to be removed from office as soon as possible so the damage against our students can be addressed.

Issues of racism is not something new for Santa Barbara City College. We have lost good employees because of the toxic nature of our campus. Personally, it contributed to my taking a 9-month leave last year. I wrote about it several times in November and December 2018 (see links below). And here we are, 19-months later and we have college “leaders” dismissing Black students and employees. 

We need to speak up against white supremacy in all its forms. For white readers, we need to counter the reality of white silence and at the same time step back and de-center ourselves so the many voices of Black students and employees are heard.

Past articles

Categories
Environment Justice Reading

Sunday Reads

This week the articles focus is environmental justice, racism, capitalism and surveillance. And these are often connected.

What Did Cedric Robinson Mean by Racial Capitalism? By Robin D.G. Kelley in the Boston Review

It’s a few years old, but remains extremely relevant to our conversation today. “So what did Robinson mean by “racial capitalism”? Building on the work of another forgotten black radical intellectual, sociologist Oliver Cox, Robinson challenged the Marxist idea that capitalism was a revolutionary negation of feudalism. Instead capitalism emerged within the feudal order and flowered in the cultural soil of a Western civilization already thoroughly infused with racialism.”

Rising up against white revenge by Max Haiven in Roar Magazine

“The courts and laws, which we have been told exist to forestall and prevent society from descending into the hell of revenge, have in so many ways revealed themselves to be institutions to defend, perpetuate and mystify the systemic, structural and institutional forms of racial capitalist vengeance that make so many racialized people, especially Black people, disposable and, indeed, make a gruesome spectacle of that disposability.”

In the Midst of the Coronavirus, California Weighs Diesel Regulations by Julia Kane in Inside Climate News

Reyes sees the push to pause regulations as “a form of environmental discrimination,” she said. Diesel exhaust disproportionately affects minority communities with fewer resources. “We are the people who can’t leave this place. We can’t move away,” she said. Now California’s freight and oil industries are using the coronavirus pandemic as an excuse to try to delay two proposed regulations that would limit diesel exhaust throughout the state, sparking outrage from clean air advocates.

Beyond a climate of comfortable ignorance by Kevin Anderson Isak Stoddard in Ecologist

“For thirty years we’ve swallowed the delusion offered by the blue pill, nonsense models of utopian tech and cheery tales of green growth. But in 2020, even the blue pill dealers are having their doubts. Perhaps now is the time to embrace the unpalatable reality revealed by the red pill?”

Trump Is Using the Pandemic to Undo Environmental Rules. It’s Hurting Black Americans by Rebecca Leber in Mother Jones

“These rollbacks do not affect everyone equally—they’re particularly devastating for people of color. And the pandemic has intensified the burden that vulnerable neighborhoods already carry.”

Our Infrastructure Is Being Built for a Climate That’s Already Gone by Shayla Love in Vice News

“The solution is to develop infrastructure that is agile, flexible, and ultimately adaptable, rather than sturdy, unchanging, and permanent.”

Smart Cities, Surveilled Citizens By Tom Westgarth in Tribune

“‘Smart cities’ technologies have grown in popularity during the coronavirus crisis, and are now being touted as tools of economic recovery – but they will also deepen the power of surveillance over our lives.”

Worker Surveillance Is on the Rise, and Has Its Roots in Centuries of Racism by Esperanza Fonseca in Truthout

High-tech corporate monitoring of workers today stems from the legacy of tracking enslaved workers in the 18th century.

SURJ’s Call to White People by Hilary Moore in Medium

“Defund the Police” is a response to decades of divestment from public health infrastructure, education systems, and good housing. This deliberate gutting of social institutions is directly related to the ballooning of police budgets and proliferation of prisons. Punishment and control have become the State’s automatic response to its failure in meeting basic needs.”

Categories
music

Music Wednesday

In the set this week, we begin with 28-minutes of ambient sounds from This Will Destroy You followed by Robert Rich. From there we ease into a meditation from Finnish-born sound artist Cucina Povera followed by song-based tracks from Blake Mills and Mark Lanegan. The set concludes with new music from Sonic Boom.

Dining Room by This Will Destroy You
Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Pandora

Distant Traveler by Robert Rich
Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Pandora

Varjokuvatanssi by Cucina Povera
Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Pandora

Money Is the One True God by Blake Mills
Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Pandora

I Wouldn’t Want To Say by Mark Lanegan
Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Pandora

On a Summer’s Day by Sonic Boom
Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Pandora