Categories
Environment Justice Reading

Sunday Reads

This week we begin with two stories about vigilante groups – the first from post-Katrina New Orleans and the second on the rising Boogaloo Movement today.

Post-Katrina, White Vigilantes Shot African-Americans With Impunity by A.C. Thompson published in ProPublica

“So far, their crimes have gone unpunished. No one was ever arrested for shooting Herrington, Alexander and Collins — in fact, there was never an investigation. I found this story repeated over and over during my days in New Orleans.”

The Boogaloo Movement Is Not What You Think by Robert Evans and Jason Wilson published in bellingcat

“In recent weeks, the term “Boogaloo” has gone mainstream after months of growing popularity in online far-right communities. Nationwide anti-lockdown protests have provided an opportunity for right-wing militias to rally, armed, in public.”

Technology

Mr Zuckerberg, Tear Down My Wall By Rebecca Liu published in Another Gaze

“It’s often hard to differentiate potentially powerful critiques of the industry from ostensibly critical stories that further entrench its hold. What might it mean, then, to acknowledge the omnipotence of technology without further reproducing the narratives that make it so powerful?” A critical look at Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim’s The Great Hack (2019) and Zhu Shengze’s Present.Perfect

Environment

‘Zombie fires’ are erupting in Alaska and likely Siberia, signaling severe Arctic fire season may lie ahead by Andrew Freedman published in The Washington Post

“On May 22, the Siberian town of Khatanga, located well north of the Arctic Circle, recorded a temperature of 78 degrees, about 46 degrees above normal. The typical maximum temperature for that day at that location is 32 degrees.”

People of Colour Experience Climate Grief More Deeply Than White People by Nylah Burton published in Vice

“Heglar says that too often, the white-led climate community leans on the idea of hope, which can lead to inaction. Hope is “such a white concept,” Heglar said. “You’re supposed to have the courage first, then you have the action, then you have the hope. But white people put hope at the front. Their insistence on hope for all of these years has led to exactly where? Nowhere.”

Being White

White Witness and the Contemporary Lynching by Zoé Samudzi published in The New Republic

“Central to the white argument for watching these videos is the idea that viewership begets justice or somehow emphasizes the notion that black life does matter and that black life is grievable (never mind that black people have long been in a near-constant state of grief and mourning over the violent negations of the lives of our kin).”

How to Subvert the Capitalist White-Supremacist University by Debarati Biswas published in Public Books

Blackademic life is a long history of survival in a space that is committed to the denial of black excellence. A look at three books: Lavelle Porter’s The Blackademic Life: Academic Fiction, Higher Education, and the Black Intellectual and Stefano Harney and Fred Moten’s The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study and Samuel Delany’s novel The Mad Man.

Keep America Christian (and White): Christian Nationalism, Fear of Ethnoracial Outsiders, and Intention to Vote for Donald Trump in the 2020 Presidential Election by Joseph O Baker, Samuel L Perry, Andrew L Whitehead published in Sociology of Religion

“Our findings affirm the continued importance of Christian nationalism, but with some important changes. Notably, we find that, beyond partisanship, xenophobia is the most important key to understanding continued support for Trump just prior to his 2020 reelection campaign. Further, [ ] xenophobia and Islamophobia explain a larger amount of the covariance between Christian nationalism and Trump voting. Some Christian nationalists are and will remain solidly behind Trump. Though we empirically affirm that Christian nationalism is not interchangeable with xenophobia or Islamophobia, the three are clearly symbiotic.”

NOTE: This is an academic journal article and is behind a paywall. Check your library to see if you can get a copy. Or touch base with me if your really interested.

Categories
Technology

Experimenting With a More Sustainable Business

I think many of you know I’m a technologist and that I enjoy playing with the latest gadgets, apps, and social media options. According to a recent article (Big Data is not the new Oil) in the Harvard Business Review, “Our browsing habits, our conversations with friends, our movements and location — all of these things are being monetized.” This fall I’ve been giving app.net a try because it pushes me into a non-librarian community (mostly developers), allows me to see what developers are interested in creating, and demonstrates a more sustainable business model that aligns well with library values. This new company, less than six months old, is experimenting and I appreciate their efforts. It may look a lot like Twitter, but scratch under the surface and there is a great deal more. Find me on ADN.

What do you think?

Categories
Library Technology

Web 3.0 and Semantic Web

My friend Tyler posted a social map on Twitter recently and I realized I am involved with many social tools on the web but definitely don’t have time to create one of these fancy maps. However, what I’ve have been playing with lately is Twine and social|median – two tools that deal with the semantic web. My understanding of the semantic web is that it harnesses collaborative groups and technology to analyze data to provide content intelligently. This is Web 3.0. It’s kind of like the Propaedeutic Enchiridion in Neil Stephenson’s Diamond Age. Anyway, I don’t know if we are quite there yet but some progress is being made. Twine is invite-only beta and social|median is in alpha (launched in February).